>> II/ Godfather II

II/ Godfather II. .

: II/ Godfather II.

II/ Godfather II

FADE IN:

The Paramount Pictures logo is presented over a simple black background, as a single trumpet plays the familiar theme of a waltz. White lettering fades in:

Mario Puzo's THE GODFATHER

There is a pause, as the trumpet concludes, and there is the additional title: - Part Two -

INT. DON CORLEONE'S OLD OFFICE - CLOSE VIEW ON MICHAEL CORLEONE - DAY

standing impassively, like a young Prince, recently crowned King.

CLOSE VIEW ON Michael's hand. ROCCO LAMPONE kisses his hand. Then it is taken away. We can SEE only the empty desk and chair of Michael's father, Vito Corleone. We HEAR, over this, very faintly a funeral dirge played in the distance, as THE VIEW MOVES SLOWLY CLOSER to the empty desk and chair.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. A SICILIAN LANDSCAPE - FULL VIEW - DAY

We can barely make out the funeral procession passing over the burnt-brown of a dry river bed. The figures move slowly, seemingly from out of hundreds of years of the past.

The MUSICIANS walking unsteadily on the rocky bed, their instruments harsh and blaring.

They are followed by six young peasant men, carrying the crude wooden coffin on their shoulders. Then the widow, a strong large woman, dressed in black, and not accepting the arms of those walking with her.

Behind her, not more than twenty relatives, few children and paisani continue alone behind the coffin.

Suddenly, we HEAR the shots of the lupara, and the musicians stop their playing. The entire procession scatters in odd directions along the rocky river bed.

The young men struggle with the burden of the heavy coffin, throwing it out of balance and nearly crashing to the ground. We hear a woman SCREAMING:

WOMAN (Sicilian) They've killed young Paolo! They've killed the boy Paolo!

EXT. SICILIAN LANDSCAPE - MED. VIEW - DAY

across the slain body of a fourteen year old boy, lying on the parched ground. In the distance we see four or five of the mourning women, the wind blowing their black dresses and veils, running up to the body of the boy. They begin to wail, and cry out in anguished Sicilian, as the widow, the mother of the murdered boy, holds her child in her arms, his fresh blood wetting her strong hands.

EXT. BARONIAL ESTATE - TIGHT MOVING VIEW - DAY

A boy, eight or nine, with wide, frightened eyes, being pulled quickly by the hand. This is VITO ANDOLINI, who is to become The Godfather.

The VIEW ALTERS revealing that he is being pulled along by his Mother, the Widow, across a field leading to the ornamental gates of a Baronial Estate of some forgotten Noble.

At various positions near the gates are men with shotguns, or lupara. The gates are opened; and the Widow and her boy are shown before DON FRANCESCO, a man in his sixties. He wears his trousers with suspenders, and an open white shirt sloppily tucked in over his enormous belly. He wears a hat to protect him from the white-hot sun, and proudly displays a gold watch and chain over his vest.

He sits in a chair, near a group of his men in the garden, listening to the Widow, who stands before him with her only son.

WIDOW (Sicilian) Don Francesco. You murdered my husband, because he would not bend. And his oldest son Paolo, because he swore revenge. But Vitone is only nine, and dumb-witted. He never speaks.

DON FRANCESCO (Sicilian) I'm not afraid of his words.

WIDOW (Sicilian) He is weak.

DON FRANCESCO (Sicilian) He will grow strong.

WIDOW (Sicilian) The child cannot harm you.

DON FRANCESCO (Sicilian) He will be a man, and then he will come for revenge.

As she pleads, the Widow moves closer to the Don, until she has practically thrown herself to her knees before him.

WIDOW (Sicilian) I beg you, Don Francesco, spare my only son. He is all I have. In the name of the Holy Spirit, I swear he will never be a danger to you...

Suddenly, she reaches under her skirt, where she has hidden a kitchen knife.

WIDOW (continuing) But I will kill you myself! (she lunges at the Mafia chieftain) Vitone, go!

The boy runs as fast as he can out through the gates. Then there is a lupara blast. He turns, and sees his Mother flung a distance of five feet from the short range of the terrible blast of the shotgun. Then he sees the men turn their attention to him. One fires at him; but the boy is quick, and disappears into a grove of olive trees.

EXT. STREETS OF CORLEONE - NIGHT

Two men roam the deserted streets of Corleone, carrying lupare. Every so often, they stop, and one shouts in a loud, almost singsong voice, like a fish peddler. Their names are MOSCA and STROLLO.

MOSCA (Sicilian) Our Friend promises misery to anyone who harbors the boy Vito Andolini. (he turns and shouts in the other direction) Our Friend promises misery to anyone who harbors the boy Vito Andolini.

INT. A HOUSE - NIGHT

A family quietly eats their dinner. The father is the local policeman, as indicated by his uniform jacket and gun, hanging nearby.

STROLLO (Sicilian, O.S.) Our Friend will be hard with any family who gives help to Vito Andolini.

One of the children looks up, about to speak. But the father sternly indicates that nothing must be said. They go on with their dinner.

EXT. THE STREETS OF CORLEONE - FULL VIEW - NIGHT

The men continue walking up and throughout the streets, far in the distance.

MOSCA (Sicilian O.S.) ...misery to any family who harbors the boy, Vito...

INT. A BARN - NIGHT

Four little girls watch with wide eyes as their mother and father bind Vito tightly in swaddled cloth, and then lift him up to the side of a mule; counter-balancing a heavy load of firewood. The father looks at the boy's almost stoically calm little face.

FATHER (Sicilian) Vito...We pray for you.

He pulls the fabric over the boy's face.

MOSCA (Sicilian O.S.) ...Andolini...

STROLLO (Sicilian O.S.) Our Friend promises misery to any family...

EXT. THE CHURCH PLAZA - NIGHT

The men continue on their night-walk, up to the plaza of the church.

STROLLO (Sicilian) ...who harbors the boy Vitone Andolini.

The figure of a single man on a mule passes them.

MOSCA (Sicilian) Let no one give help to the boy Vito Andolini...

The man on the mule makes his way out of the village and disappears into the distance.

We begin to hear, very quietly, the Waltz repeated once again.

EXT. STEAMSHIP - CLOSE VIEW ON VITO - DAY

huddled in blankets, on the deck of the ship in Steerage. He does not say a word. The Waltz grows louder as the VIEW ALTERS, revealing the hundreds of immigrant families huddled together with all their earthly possessions on their way to America.

Then, suddenly, the Waltz stops.

THE NEW YORK HARBOR - DAY

SILENCE. We glide past the Statue of Liberty.

VIEW on the IMMIGRANTS standing on shipboard silently; looking. Vito is standing with them, his eyes wide.

CAMERA MOVES IN on the statue, then MOVING PAST, on to the beautiful buildings of Ellis Island.

EXT. ELLIS ISLAND - DAY

A tugboat pulls a barge brimming with immigrants into the Ellis Island harbor. Uniformed officials of the Immigration Service load them up toward the main building.

INT. ELLIS PROCESSING HALL - DAY

The hundreds of immigrant families sit on rows of benches in the great hall. Various painted lines lead to the steps and processing rooms above.

There is the babble of many interviews going on simultaneously, uncertainly, in different languages.

Vito is bundled in an old coat, with a large tag pinned on it: "Vitone Andolini -- Corleone, Sicilia."

He stands, moves up in the line, when several other immigrant boys, older than he, rush up an push him back in the line. Weak from the trip, he falls to the floor. The boys laugh, derisive in a language he cannot understand. He struggles to his feet, lifting his makeshift bags; staring at them in an icy hatred.

INT. PROCESSING ROOM - DAY

Three or four interviews are crowded into the small room; they are conducted in English. From the expression on Vito's face, and from the fragmented of the English, we realize that he doesn't understand a word of it.

OFFICIAL (English) What is your name?

The man waits, impatiently.

OFFICIAL Your name?

Vito doesn't answer. The Official pulls the tag pinned onto his coat and copies to down on his form, using a typewriter.

OFFICIAL (speaking as he types) Vito...Corleone. Step up, over there.

He hands the form to another official.

CLOSE VIEW on the form. The name has been entered as Vito Corleone.

INT. MEDICAL EXAM - DAY

Vito is stripped to the waist, as other immigrants wait.

The DOCTOR is just finishing his examination. He shakes his head, and then writes on the medical form.

DOCTOR Can you understand me?

Vito stares blankly.

DOCTOR You understand? Smallpox. Smallpox.

He doesn't understand. The doctor turns to the Immigration Official.

DOCTOR Quarantine...six months.

UNDERGROUND PASSAGEWAY - MOVING VIEW - DAY

Officials move a group of immigrant men, including Vito, to the quarantine section of the Island.

INT. QUARANTINE HALLWAY - DAY

The official stops at each doorway, and reads off a name.

OFFICIAL Salvatore Ormenta.

The man moves into the room, and the group proceeds.

OFFICIAL Vito Corleone.

No one responds. The guard moves to the boy, reads his new name tag. And then, not unkindly:

GUARD That's you.

He opens the door, and Vito enters the room.

EXT. THE STATUE OF LIBERTY - DAY

The VIEW slowly begins to pull back, revealing this to be the view from inside the quarantine cell, where Vito stands on his bench, looking out to the statue through the barred window.

Then he turns, and sits in the corner. He is silent for a long time.

Then, in a sweet, pure voice, he sings to himself in Sicilian.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. CATHOLIC CHURCH - MOVING CLOSE SHOT - DAY

A nine year old boy, dressed immaculately in white, with a large white silk bow tied to his shoulder, moving slowly down the aisle of the church with a group of other children dressed in white. He has dark black hair, and his face is unmistakably similar to young Vito's. He moves slowly, his hands clasped around a golden missal. We HEAR only the pure voice of Vito in Sicilian, his sad song reaching out from the past, as ANTHONY CORLEONE, his Grandson, moves on the way to his First Holy Communion more than fifty years later.

FULL VIEW

The little children move in procession down to the Altar, where the PRIEST raises the Host, and performs the Communion Mass in Latin.

PRIEST Ecce Agnus Dei, ecce qui tollit peccata mundi.

MOVING VIEW ON THE PRIEST

and Altar boys, as he moves along the row of kneeling children, blessing them, and administering their first Communion.

CLOSE MOVING VIEW

as the innocent faces receive the Host; finally, the Priest comes to Anthony.

PRIEST Corpus Christi.

ANTHONY Amen.

EXT. LAKE TAHOE ESTATE - DAY

The lawns of this great estate on the shore of Lake Tahoe are covered with guests of a wonderful party to honor the First Holy Communion of Anthony Corleone, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Corleone. A full dance orchestra plays music of the times on a pavilion bandstand built especially for the occasion. Speedboats roar through the water, pulling youthful waterskiers; and the pool and private harbor are filled with laughing, swimming guests. It is Fall of 1958.

MED. VIEW

Anthony, in his Communion suit sits alone at the table, looking like a lonely young Prince.

KAY (O.S.) Smile, Anthony. Smile.

He does, and a flash goes off.

PHOTOGRAPHER (O.S.) Now, one with the whole family.

KAY (O.S.) Mr. Corleone can't right now...

KAY CORLEONE enters from the side, leading her four year old daughter, MARY, and MAMA CORLEONE to pose with Anthony.

KAY (O.S.) ...but we'll get one with the ladies.

PHOTOGRAPHER All together now, c'mon, Anthony... CHEESE and (flash)

KAY Thank you.

She smiles as she leaves the photographer, and then lets out a weary sigh to Mama, as she touches the slightly protruding belly.

KAY Do you think it'll show in the picture?

MAMA Two months never shows. Two months look like you had a big lunch.

VOICE (O.S.) Oh, Mrs. Corleone.

A slender, aristocratic WOMAN in her late forties is waving to KAY.

MRS. BARRETT Hello, Mrs. Corleone. I'm Fran Barrett, our place is just down the lake. This is my husband, Marshall.

KAY I'm so happy you could come.

MR. BARRETT The place is transformed. We've been watching workmen come and go all summer.

MRS. BARRETT Where is Mr. Corleone?

KAY A business meeting ran late...but he promised he wouldn't be long.

Kay puts her arm around little Anthony's shoulder.

KAY This is our son Anthony Vito Corleone. Today he made his First Holy Communion.

EXT. TAHOE GATE AND KENNELS - DAY

A confusion of cars; arriving and parking. The squad of parking attendants are supplemented by a whole team of the local Police, working as high-class parking valets.

A very beautiful, statuesque woman, though slightly drunk, DEANNA DUNN, slams the door of a powder blue Mercedes and hurries barefoot through the great stone gate.

DEANNA I will not shut my mouth, and keep your Goddamn hands off of me!

She is followed by a harried, FREDDIE CORLEONE, dressed with flash in the Hollywood style, and carrying her shoes in his hands.

FREDO Honey! Wait a minute; let's go for a drive.

DEANNA I just had a drive; besides, I want to see my brother-in-law Michael.

FREDO (trying to get her to put her shoes on) Yeah, but I don't want him to see you.

Deanna pauses reflectively a moment, allowing Fredo to get her shoes on.

DEANNA What beats me, is how you guys could be brothers. You musta been your Mother's rotten egg.

She kicks off the shoes, giggling, and runs toward a waiter.

DEANNA (lifting a glass of champagne) Young man, young man...thank you, young man.

WAITER (impressed) Excuse me, but aren't you...

DEANNA Yes, you saw me in the movies, Good Humor man, and yes, I had more off than my shoes!

FREDO Goddamn bitch.

DEANNA Relax, Freddie honey. Come dance with me.

She extends her hand to him.

FREDO Listen, Michael's got a lot of nice people here. Friends of Kay's. He'll never forgive me if you ruin his party.

DEANNA I hate to see you cringe in front of him. How come you're so scared of your own kid brother?

FREDO He's the head of the family.

Disgusted, she turns around, and heads toward the music.

DEANNA Don't follow me!

EXT. TAHOE LAWN AND TABLES - MED. SHOT - DAY

Rushing through the tables, waving an arm jangling with gold jewelry, and carrying several gift-wrapped packages, is a hardened and aging CONNIE CORLEONE. She is followed by a blond, and wrinkled-handsome escort named MERLE.

CONNIE Mama...Mama! Here I am!

She throws her arms around her Mother, who returns the affection somewhat reproachfully.

MAMA Constanzia. We expected you last week; we sent the car to pick you up at the airport last week.

CONNIE I know, it was chaos; but anyway, here I am one week late. (lifting a shiny green package out of Merle's arms) This is for my Mama. You remember Merle?

MAMA (not giving him a chance to greet her) Yes, thank you.

CONNIE How are the kids?

MAMA Well, thank you, they asked for you all week.

CONNIE I got surprises for everybody!

MAMA (glancing at the wrapping) Bought at the airport.

CONNIE (gazing about) This is swell. Where's Michael? I've got things to get straight with him and I can't wait on line.

MAMA You go see your children first, and then you wait to see your brother like everybody else.

EXT. THE BOATHOUSE - DAY

A porch-like foyer of the boathouse, where a group of five or six men wait, some nervously. Some sit, and some pace.

MED. CLOSE VIEW

on one of these men, FRANKIE PENTANGELI, approaching his sixties, with gray hair (the little of it left). He's a bit scruffy, this morning's shave of his white beard is not perfect, and he seems tired. He is accompanied by an associate-bodyguard, WILLY CICCI; thin and dark, and also dressed up for the occasion. Frankie tries to get the attention of one of the waiters; a college-groomed young man in white sports jacket and black bow-tie.

PENTANGELI Hey, kid! You got any red wine?

WAITER (offering the tray) Only champagne and cocktails.

PENTANGELI Forget it...

Finally, he sees someone he recognizes, Fredo, and shouts out in a husky voice:

PENTANGELI Fredo! Sonuvabitch. You look great.

Fredo squints in his direction; finally recognizes him.

FREDO Who's that? Pentangeli? Frankie "Five-Angels"...thought you were never coming West.

PENTANGELI (affectionately) Gotta check up on my boys. Hey, what's with the food? Some kid in a white jacket brings me a ritz cracker with some chopped liver. 'Canapes,' he says. I say, 'Can a peas, my ass, that's a ritz cracker with chopped liver.' Go get me a salami sandwich and a glass of wine or I'll send you and your white jacket to the dry cleaners!

They get a good laugh at this fresh breath of New York.

FREDO Gee, Frankie, it's good to see you. Reminds me of old times.

PENTANGELI You remember Willy Cicci, don't you, Freddie? We was all together with the old man Clemenza in Brooklyn... before...uh...

FREDO We were all upset about that.

PENTANGELI That's what I'm here to talk to your brother about. What's with him, I got to get a letter of introduction to have a 'sitdown'?

FREDO (throwing his arm around him) C'mon, I see what I can do.

EXT. TAHOE PAVILION - MED. VIEW - DAY

The orchestra wears white summer sportcoats and black tuxedo slacks as they play a tango behind monogrammed music stands. A professional dance team, probably imported from Vegas, dance the tango for the excited guests.

INT. TAHOE BOATHOUSE - DAY

A large and very beautiful room overlooking the lake. It is dominated by an enormous bar, behind which stands ALBERT NERI, discreetly in the background.

MICHAEL CORLEONE sits on a large sofa, his back to us. Standing to one side is a tired and somewhat uneasy TOM HAGEN. Standing before Michael is SANDRA CORLEONE, Sonny's widow; her daughter, one of the twins, FRANCESCA CORLEONE, and a handsome young man of twenty, GARDNER SHAW.

SANDRA Michael, this is Gardner Shaw. Francesca and he have been seeing each other for six months now. Gardner, this is Francie's Uncle Michael.

GARDNER (a little nervous) I've heard a lot about you, Mr. Corleone.

MICHAEL (O.S.) Sit down. Francie.

The couple sit themselves on the sofa opposite Michael.

SANDRA They would like to set an engagement date, and...

MICHAEL Let them speak for themselves.

VIEW ON MICHAEL, calm, thoughtful. One can tell that he has special affection for his niece.

FRANCESCA We love each other, Uncle Michael. And, we want to be married. I came to ask for your blessing.

There is a loud KNOCKING on the door; then Fredo's voice.

FREDO (O.S.) Hey, Mike...guess who's here?

Neri goes to answer it, cracks the door open.

NERI Not now, Freddie...

FREDO Tell Mike Frankie 'Five-Angels' is here.

NERI Not now...

Neri closes the door, and Michael looks at the nervous young man.

MICHAEL Francesca is my oldest brother's daughter. He died many years ago, and ever since I've felt much more of a father than an uncle. I love her very much. I'm pleased and impressed that you had the thought to come to me before going on with your plans. It shows me that you're a considerate man, and will be good to her. What are you studying in college?

GARDNER My major is Fine Arts, sir.

MICHAEL How will Fine Arts support your new wife?

GARDNER It's embarrassing to say, sir, but I'm a major stockholder in the family corporation.

MICHAEL (smiling) Never be embarrassed by your wealth. This recent contempt for money is still another trick of the rich to keep the poor without it. (warmly) Of course I give you my blessing. Let's set the wedding soon...it will be my pleasure to give the bride away.

They all smile, and rise.

MICHAEL (continuing) ...and take a few courses in Business Administration just to be on the safe side!

They laugh; Michael moves toward them. Francesca throws her arms around him, and kisses her favorite uncle. The flushed young man shakes his hand heartily.

FRANCESCA Thank you, Uncle Michael.

They all take their leave; Michael turns to Hagen.

MICHAEL Make her dowry impressive. He comes from a family who still thinks an Italian bride goes barefoot.

EXT. TAHOE SWIMMING POOLS AND HARBOR - DAY

Francesca and Gardner are greeted by her twin sister and their young friends, who squeal and embrace at the good news. Someone throws someone in the pool, and life is good.

MED. CLOSE

Francesca kisses her Aunt Kay.

FRANCESCA Uncle Michael is the greatest man ever!

VIEW on Kay - happy for her niece.

INT. TAHOE BOATHOUSE - DAY

Michael sits in the darkened boathouse. Tom Hagen paces. Michael is looking at photographs. Neri stands over him.

CLOSE ON MICHAEL

studying the pictures.

NERI (O.S.) His name is Fred Vincent. He owns a small pizza parlor in Buffalo...

CLOSE ON THE PICTURES

Snapshots of a middle-aged man, handsome, Italian. There is something familiar about him.

NERI (O.S.) (continuing) ...American wife and two small kids. We traced him and found that he's in the country illegally, from Sicily...

Michael looks at another picture. The same man. Only younger, and dressed in Sicilian shepherd's clothing. We remember him as FABRIZZIO...Michael's traitorous bodyguard in Sicily.

NERI (O.S.) ...came over around 1956. Sponsored by the Barzini Family.

Michael puts the pictures down.

MICHAEL It's him. Fabrizzio. (almost to himself) Revenge is a dish that tastes best when it's cold.

NERI How do you want me to handle it?

Michael glances at Hagen, who has been waiting in the room.

MICHAEL Later. Tom?

Hagen brings him a folder; then, as Michael glances through it:

HAGEN I've cleared it through the Senator's chief aide, a man named Turnbull. Turnbull's a heavy gambler, and into us for over a hundred grand, so I figure his information is reliable.

Neri moves to the bar, to prepare Michael a drink.

HAGEN The Senator can be set up; but he thinks of himself as a clean politician. So it's got to be on terms he can live with: campaign contribution, donation to a charitable cause that he controls, things like that. If he gets even the inkling that you think you're buying him, he'll freeze up. Nevada's a funny state, they like things both ways here... All right. Turnbull says the Senator will be here at two-thirty, and he's been primed. He knows you'll want to meet with him alone, and he knows it's about the Tropicana's license. At any rate, he expects to be introduced around to some of the influential people here today, and generally treated as an ordinary guest. Just go light on him, Mikey, sometimes the biggest crooks don't like to think of themselves as crooks...

Michael glances at Hagen, as though that last remark was unnecessary.

HAGEN I'm sorry; of course, you know that.

MICHAEL Two-thirty. That gives me time to see my boy.

HAGEN Connie's outside.

Michael doesn't want to see her.

HAGEN I promised; she said it was urgent.

Michael nods.

MICHAEL All right. Apologize to Pentangeli.

Neri opens the door; Hagen exits, and Connie steps in impatiently, followed by Merle.

MICHAEL I said I would see my sister, alone.

MERLE I think this concerns me too. (taking a cigarette from the dispenser) You don't, do you?

Connie steps forward, kisses Michael on the cheek.

CONNIE How are you, honey? You've met Merle, haven't you. He was with me in Vegas.

MICHAEL I saw him with you.

CONNIE We're going to Europe next week. I want to get passage booked on the Queen.

MICHAEL Why do you come to me? Why don't you go to a travel agent?

MERLE We're going to get married first.

Michael is silent. Then he rises, and moves to the window overlooking the lake.

MICHAEL The ink on your divorce isn't dry. Your children see you on weekends; your oldest boy, Michael Francis... was in some trouble with the Reno police over some petty theft that you don't even know about.

CONNIE Michael...

MICHAEL You fly around the world with lazy young men who don't have any love for you, and use you like a whore.

CONNIE You're not my father!

MICHAEL Then why do you come to me?

CONNIE Because I need MONEY!

MICHAEL (softly) Connie, I want to be reasonable with you. You have a house here, with us. You can live here with your kids...and you won't be deprived of anything. I don't know much about Merle; I don't know what he does for a living; what he lives on. Why don't you tell him marriage is really out of the question; and that you can't see him any more. He'll understand. But if you disobey me, and marry this pimp...it would disappoint me.

CONNIE It was my father's money; and I'm entitled to what I need. Where is Tom Hagen?

She turns angrily, leaving Michael standing face to face with Merle.

MICHAEL Are you finished?

MERLE I think so.

MICHAEL Then out.

Merle puts out his cigarette and leaves, quickly.

EXT. TAHOE PAVILION - FULL VIEW - DAY

The orchestra has struck up a "Paul Jones," where two concentric circles of young people march in opposite directions, until the music stops. Then they take whomever is opposite them as their new dance partner.

VIEW ON THE HARBOR AREA

Francesca and her twin, Gardner and their elite young friends roar out of the private harbor, to get up on the water skis. We notice ROCCO LAMPONE, move along a path leading to a separate and more private boathouse. A small covered craft approaches, ties off, and a group of three men step on to the pathway, shake hands with Lampone - and follow him to the large boathouse where Michael conducts his business.

CLOSE VIEW

Pentangeli has led Mama up to the dance floor, and is having some difficulty with the orchestra.

PENTANGELI I can't believe that out of thirty professional musicians, not one of you is Italian! (as the musicians laugh) C'mon, give us a tarantella.

He waves his hands, conducting, and singing. The piano starts a vamp, the drums uncertainly join in. A clarinet starts to play "Pop Goes the Weasel," and soon the rest of the orchestra is playing that. They look to Pentangeli for approval. Disgusted, he goes back to his table, eating a handful of canapes.

INT. THE BOATHOUSE - DAY

Rocco ushers an older Italian, bundled up against the cold and wet of his boatride, to Michael.

The man shows respect to Michael, who quickly indicates that Neri should get him a drink.

MICHAEL Rocco, his friends must be hungry. See what you can do, but I'd like to keep them away from the guests.

The older man, JOHNNY 'BLUE BOY' OLA, gestures to his bodyguards, and they follow Lampone.

MICHAEL You know my lawyer, Tom Hagen. Johnny Ola.

OLA Sure, I remember Tom from the old days.

Tom shakes hands with Ola, remembering him, and his importance.

MICHAEL Tom isn't going to sit in with us, Johnny. He only handles specific areas of the family business. Tom?

HAGEN Sure, Mikey.

He gathers up some of his papers, as the three men remain silent, waiting for him to go before they talk. It's clear Tom doesn't want to be excluded.

HAGEN If you need anything, just...

MICHAEL Just tell Rocco I'm waiting.

Hagen nods and leaves. As soon as the door closes:

OLA I just left our friend in Miami.

MICHAEL How is his health?

OLA Not good.

MICHAEL Is there anything I can do; anything I can send?

OLA He appreciates your concern, Michael, and your respect.

There's a KNOCK on the door; a moment, and then Rocco quietly enters and takes his place without disturbing the conversation.

OLA The hotel's registered owners are one Jacob Lawrence, and Sidney Barclay, both Beverly Hills attorneys. In reality it's split between the Old Lakeville Road Group from Cleveland, and our friend in Miami. He takes care of others outside the country, you know who I mean. Meyer Klingman runs the store, and does all right, but I've been instructed to tell you, that if you move him out, our friend in Miami will go along with you.

MICHAEL He's very kind, tell him it's appreciated. I'm sure it will be profitable all the way around.

OLA He always makes money for his partners. One by one, our old friends are gone. Death, natural or not, prison, deported. Our friend in Miami is the only one left, because he always made money for his partners.

The door opens suddenly, and standing there in his white Communion suit, is Michael's boy Anthony. A moment later, Kay appears, and takes the boy's hand.

KAY Anthony, Daddy's busy.

MICHAEL (rising) This is my boy, and my wife. Mr. John Ola of Miami.

KAY I'm sorry, Michael. Senator Geary's here, and Mr. and Mrs. Barrett wanted to thank you before they left. Won't you join us, Mr. Ola?

MICHAEL Mr. Ola's just leaving, Kay. Please tell the Senator I won't be a minute.

Pause; she stands there a moment.

MICHAEL (continuing) Kay.

KAY Yes, Michael.

EXT. THE BOATHOUSE - DAY

Kay closes the door. It seems as though Michael has violated some sort of promise to her by having this man here today. She looks up toward the first boathouse.

WHAT SHE SEES:

The covered launch, and Ola's three bodyguards, eating while they wait.

MED. VIEW

Anthony runs away from her, heading toward the house.

KAY Anthony! (she runs after him) Anthony, where are you going?

Moodily, the boy stops, turns, and walks back to his table of honor without answering her.

EXT. TAHOE TABLES AND PAVILION - VIEW ON THE PAVILION - DAY

The orchestra has taken its break; now two couples in formal dress are performing the Quartet from Rigoletto.

VIEW ON HAGEN

sitting by himself, a little down, having a drink. He's waiting for Michael to re-summon him. SANDRA, Sonny's widow, sits opposite him.

HAGEN Where's my wife?

SANDRA With Mama, putting the baby to sleep. Francesca's very happy. Michael was kind to her. She idolizes him. (pause; she looks at a despondent Hagen) The children are all out in the speedboat. I'm going to my house.

Sandra gets up, still an attractive woman, and walks alone to the back path that leads to her home on the estate.

VIEW ON THE PAVILION

The returned orchestra strikes a big, show-biz chord, intended to command the guests' attention.

The orchestra LEADER raises his hands for silence, and makes an announcement over the P.A. system.

MAESTRO Ladies and gentlemen, a most distinguished guest would like to say a few words: Senator and Mrs. Pat Geary of the state of Nevada!

A big hand, as the smiling SENATOR introduces his WIFE by holding her arm up to the crowd, and then proceeds alone to the bandstand.

MED. VIEW

Michael stands with Kay and Mrs. Geary. The Senator's presence seems to be a statement of political and social status.

A little distance away, his beautiful son Anthony sits quietly, in an unmistakably morose mood.

INT. TAHOE - SANDRA'S HOUSE - DAY

We HEAR the applause and whistles echoing in the distance. Sandra stands in her bedroom, looking at the door. We SEE a photograph of SONNY, and also one of their wedding.

A moment goes by, and then Tom Hagen enters, closing the door behind him.

We begin to HEAR Senator Geary's amplified voice resounding over the lake. Hagen moves to Sandra. She takes him in her arms, comforting, holding his head against her full breast.

HAGEN (quietly) He doesn't want my help any more. He doesn't need it.

SANDRA We don't know that's true, he never said that.

HAGEN I can feel it in the way he talks to me.

He moves to the dresser; pours himself a drink.

HAGEN Just now when Johnny Ola showed up, he asked me to leave them alone. Ola is Hyman Roth's Sicilian contact. I was on the inside of ten, twenty meetings with him. But today Mike asked me to leave, like an outsider.

SANDRA Talk to him. Tell him how you feel.

HAGEN It's as though he blames me for the ground the family lost when I was Consigliere to Sonny.

Sandra pulls Hagen to her, and kisses him passionately on the mouth.

HAGEN I love Michael, I want to help him, be close to him. I don't want to end up a third string lawyer making property settlements for the hotels.

Sandra knows he needs her. Slowly she begins to undress.

SANDRA We have a little time now.

EXT. THE PAVILION - VIEW ON SENATOR GEARY - DAY

SENATOR GEARY ...my thanks, and the thanks of the young people of the State of Nevada, for this most impressive endowment... (he holds a check in his hand) ...made to the University in the name of Anthony Vito Corleone. Thank you, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Corleone.

Applause. Senator Geary returns the microphone to the Maestro who adds:

MAESTRO And now, the Nevada Boys' Choir have prepared a special thank you for Mr. Michael Corleone.

He turns to a small Choir Master, who leads the Boys' Choir in a choral arrangement of "MR. WONDERFUL."

VIEW ON SENATOR GEARY

shaking hands with Michael, as Press Photographers snap pictures, showing the check; showing a special award of Gratitude from the State; Mrs. Corleone and Mrs. Geary; all together; Michael and his son; Senator Geary and Michael's son; and on and on. In the midst of this:

SENATOR GEARY Where can we meet alone?

Michael indicates the boathouse a distance away, where Neri seems to be waiting for them. Then Michael leans to Rocco:

MICHAEL Find Hagen.

Rocco sets off; as more pictures are taken, and the:

BOYS' CHOIR

sings its lovely arrangement of "Mr. Wonderful."

INT. TAHOE BOATHOUSE - MED. VIEW - DAY

Michael, the Senator, Neri and Rocco make a group in the dark, large room.

MICHAEL It was very kind of you to come to my home on this occasion, Senator. My wife has been very concerned with making a good impression on the people who are our neighbors, and your appearance here has made her very happy. If I can ever perform a service for you, you only have to ask.

The door opens, and Hagen sheepishly makes his way in.

MICHAEL My lawyer, Tom Hagen. He arranged this all through your man Turnbull.

SENATOR GEARY I thought we would meet alone.

MICHAEL I trust these men with my life. They are my right arms; I cannot insult them by sending them away.

SENATOR GEARY (taking out some medication) Some water.

He addresses that to Neri, who resentfully goes to fetch the Senator a glass of water.

SENATOR GEARY Alright, Corleone. I'm going to be very frank with you. Maybe more frank than any man in my position has ever spoken to you before.

Michael nods, indicating that he should do so.

SENATOR GEARY The Corleone family controls two major hotels in Vegas; one in Reno. The licenses were grandfathered in, so you had no difficulties with the Gaming Commission. But I have the idea from sources... (takes the water from Neri and swallows his pills) ...that you're planning to move in on the Tropicana. In another week or so you'll move Klingman out, which leaves you with only one technicality. The license, which is now in Klingman's name.

MICHAEL Turnbull is a good man.

SENATOR GEARY Let's forget the bullshit, I don't want to stay here any longer than I have to. You can have the license for two hundred and fifty thousand in cash, plus a monthly fee equal to five percent of the gross...

Michael is taken aback; he looks at Hagen.

SENATOR GEARY ...of all three Corleone hotels.

Hagen is frustrated; all his information was wrong.

MICHAEL Senator Geary, I speak to you as a businessman who has made a large investment in your state. I have made that state my home; plan to raise my children here. The license fee from the Gambling Commission costs one thousand dollars; why would I ever consider paying more?

SENATOR GEARY I'm going to squeeze you, Corleone, because I don't like you; I don't like the kind of man you are. I despise your masquerade, and the dishonest way you pose yourself and your fucking family.

VIEW ON HAGEN

glances at Michael.

VIEW ON MICHAEL

makes no outward reaction.

MICHAEL (quietly) We're all part of the same hypocrisy, Senator. But never think it applies to my family.

SENATOR GEARY All right, then let me say you'll pay me because it's in your interests to pay me.

VIEW ON GEARY

rising.

SENATOR GEARY I'll expect your answer, with payment, by tomorrow morning. Only don't contact me...from now on, deal only through Turnbull.

He is almost out the door.

MICHAEL Senator... (cold and calm) ...you can have my answer now if you'd like.

Geary turns back.

MICHAEL My offer is this. Nothing...not even the thousand dollars for the Gaming Commission, which I'd appreciate if you would put up personally.

Geary returns Michael's hard look; then laughs and leaves. Slowly Michael turns to Hagen.

VIEW ON HAGEN

embarrassed at being so off the mark.

MICHAEL It's all right, Tom, we'll talk later. Tell Frankie Pentangeli I'd like him to have dinner at my family table before we do business.

EXT. THE PAVILION - NIGHT

Now the light has faltered, and the young waiters have put up the night lights. The tables are all properly set for dinner, with candles on each one.

The orchestra is playing quiet, unobtrusive dinner music, and many of the guests have begun to help themselves to the impressive buffet, under a party tent.

MED. VIEW

Michael sits at a large table with Kay, his son Anthony, Mama, Hagen and TERESA, Connie and Merle' Fredo and Deanna, and Frankie Pentangeli.

MAMA Cent' Anne.

This, the table of honor, all raise their glasses and repeat the toast.

DEANNA What's 'cent' Anne?'

FREDO A hundred years...it's a toast.

CONNIE It means we should all live happily for one hundred years. The family. If my Father were alive, it'd be true.

MAMA Connie.

CONNIE Merle, have you met my sister-in- law Deanna?

DEANNA What a pleasure, Merle. (shaking hands)

MAMA (Sicilian) Those two are perfect for each other.

MERLE What's that mean?

CONNIE Mama!

PENTANGELI (Sicilian) Michael, in all respect, I didn't come three thousand miles for dinner.

MICHAEL (Sicilian) I know.

PENTANGELI (Sicilian) When do we talk?

MICHAEL (Sicilian) After dinner.

By now, the conversation has become exclusively Sicilian, with Merle and Deanna, looking from side to side like in a tennis match. Finally, Kay, to be polite:

KAY Anthony, you were talking to Mr. Pentangeli?

ANTHONY His name is "Five-Angels."

PENTANGELI Yeah, the kid and me talked Sicilian. A one-way conversation!

INT. TAHOE BOATHOUSE - NIGHT

Pentangeli is angry; but because it is Michael he is talking to, he keeps his voice low and represses his desire to shout.

PENTANGELI Sure, Pete Clemenza died of a heart attack, but the Rosato Brothers gave it to him.

MICHAEL We were all heartbroken at the news; but that wasn't cause to start a war.

PENTANGELI Okay, now it's my family in Brooklyn; and I wanna keep up Clemenza's loyalty to you. But how can I run my family with you challenging my every move? You're too far from the street, Mike, the only way to reason with the Rosato Brothers is to whack 'em and whack 'em fast.

MICHAEL You were unfair with them.

PENTANGELI Says who?

MICHAEL Clemenza promised Rosato three territories in the Bronx after he died, and then you took over and welched.

PENTANGELI Clemenza promised them nothing, he hated the sonsuvbitches.

MICHAEL They feel cheated.

PENTANGELI Michael, you're sitting up here in the Sierra Mountains with champagne cocktails making judgment on the way I run my family.

MICHAEL (suddenly in Sicilian) Your family still carries the name Corleone, and you will run it like a Corleone!

PENTANGELI (Sicilian) And while I feed my family in New York, you put the knife in my back in Miami.

MICHAEL (firm) Frankie, you're a good old man, and you've been loyal to my Father for years...so I hope you can explain what you mean.

PENTANGELI The Rosatos are running crazy; taking hostages, spitting in my face, because they're backed by the Jew in Miami.

MICHAEL I know. That's why I want you to be fair with them.

PENTANGELI How can you be fair with animals? They recruit niggers and spicks; they do violence in their own Grandmother's neighborhoods. And everything is dope and whores; the gambling is left to last. Let me run my family without you on my back. I want them taken care of.

MICHAEL No. There are things that I have planned with Hyman Roth. I don't want them disturbed.

PENTANGELI You give your loyalty to a Jew over your own blood.

MICHAEL Frankie, you know my father respected Roth, did business with him.

PENTANGELI He did business...but he never trusted him.

Pentangeli takes his hat, and leaves.

NERI Should he go?

MICHAEL The old man had too much vino rosso, or he'd never talk openly that way. Let him go back to New York; I've already made my plans. (he checks his watch) It's late; I've spent so little time at the party.

EXT. THE LAWNS AND TABLES - FULL VIEW - NIGHT

By now the sun has fallen and the lawns of the Corleone estate are lit by moonlight. Beautifully dressed couples dance as the orchestra plays a foxtrot of the late fifties.

VIEW ON THE DANCE FLOOR

Deanna has been dancing with Fredo; she has gotten drunk and it teasing her husband by flirting with other men on the floor.

DEANNA I wanta dance...whatsa matter with that?

FREDO Dancing is alright; you're falling on the floor.

DEANNA Whatsamatter, you don't want me to dance with him 'cause he's a man!

FREDO Deanna, I'm going to belt you right in the mouth!

DEANNA These Eye-ties are really crazy when it comes to their wives.

By now guests are starting to notice the disturbance; Michael is with Kay, and some friends; Rocco catches his eye.

DEANNA (O.S.) Jesus, never marry a WOP, they treat their wives like shit.

VIEW on Kay, listening, embarrassed by her flashy sister-in- law.

VIEW ON FREDO AND DEANNA

Rocco passes by Fredo and whispers:

ROCCO Freddie, Mike says take care of it, or I have to.

DEANNA He's a friend of your brother!

Without another word, Rocco grabs firm hold of her and whisks her out of the crowd.

DEANNA "Shuffle off to Buffa... Shuffle off to Buffa... Shuffle off to Buffalooooo..."

Freddie mops his forehead, and moves to Michael.

FREDO Hey Mike, what can I say?

MICHAEL Forget it, just go take care of her.

EXT. THE HARBOR DECK - NIGHT

A large group of Tahoe teenagers join the Corleone youngsters sitting around a large fire out by the harbor. Gardner and Francie, sitting arm in arm.

EXT. TABLE OF HONOR - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

Little Anthony, in his white suit, sitting alone.

EXT. MAIN GATE - NIGHT

A taxi pulls up, and is signaled over to the gate by a policeman carrying a torch flashlight.

Connie and Merle enter; Merle tips the cop, and the cab drives off.

EXT. DANCE FLOOR AND PAVILION - MOVING TWO SHOT - NIGHT

Kay and Michael dancing in the moonlight.

MICHAEL How's the baby?

KAY Sleeping inside me.

MICHAEL Does it feel like a boy?

KAY Yes, Michael, it does.

MICHAEL I'm sorry about some of the people I had to see today. It was bad timing... but it couldn't be helped.

KAY It made me think of what you told me once. In five years, the Corleone family will be completely legitimate. That was seven years ago.

He has no answer for her; except that he loves and values her, and holds her tight, as they dance amid their guests, all dressed elegantly for the social event of the season.

The VIEW LOOSENS to show the entire, night-lit party.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. LAS VEGAS CHAPEL - MED. CLOSE VIEW - NIGHT

A Cadillac limousine waits for some people inside the tacky, Las Vegas marriage mill.

INT. THE CHAPEL - NIGHT

Some quiet, informally dressed couples wait in the rear of the chapel; some talking, others sitting nervously.

A single organ plays some standard wedding music.

The VIEW PANS up to the altar, where Connie and Merle, in the same clothing they wore to the Tahoe party, are being married by a Justice of the Peace.

The Justice goes through the bored, simple ceremony, and we begin to HEAR an echo of the waltz Connie danced with her father, when she was married all those years ago in Long Island.

EXT. THE TROPICANA - LAS VEGAS - MED. VIEW - DAY

A dark car pulls up to the glitter of the neon facade. Albert Neri, alone, leaves it to the parking valets, and moves quickly through the automatic doors, into the main casino. We still hear the CORLEONE WALTZ.

INT. THE TROPICANA - DAY

Albert Neri enters the room; glances around a moment, and then heads toward the crap table, where a short, middle-aged man, KLINGMAN, stands by the pit boss. Several security guards of the casino, are at their posts.

NERI Are you Klingman?

KLINGMAN Who's asking?

NERI Where can we talk?

KLINGMAN Right here.

NERI I represent the interests of the Corleone family. We make the invitation to you to tie up your affairs and be out of the hotel by Monday morning.

KLINGMAN Who do you think you're talking to?

NERI You said you were Klingman.

KLINGMAN You don't come in here, talk to an owner in Las Vegas like that.

NERI You missed my point; you are no longer an owner.

KLINGMAN Get out of my hotel.

Neri stands in front of him, smiling.

KLINGMAN Boys, get him out of here.

Quickly, Neri moves toward Klingman, and slaps him hard several times in the face, knocking off his glasses... Red- faced, Klingman gets down on his knees to pick them up once, again. Glasses on, he looks to his guards.

WHAT HE SEES

They stand, motionless.

VIEW ON KLINGMAN

Humiliated, Klingman moves across the casino floor, past a few interested gamblers, and his own people. Neri slowly follows.

INT. SHOWROOM - MED. VIEW - DAY

A typical, Lido de Paris type of show is in rehearsal, as Klingman backs into the showroom.

HIS VIEW

Neri keeps coming.

VIEW ON KLINGMAN

realizes that no one will help him. He finally capitulates.

KLINGMAN All right! All right, I'll be out.

Neri keeps moving, then heads past the terrified man, sits down at a table, and looks up at the stage.

NERI (to the staring performers) Keep it going.

EXT. A STREET IN BUFFALO, NEW YORK - NIGHT

The neon lights that spell out "FRED'S PIZZERIA" go out; after a moment a man in an overcoat steps out, and turns to lock the door of his restaurant. The Corleone Waltz continues over this. He turns.

MED. CLOSE VIEW

FRED VINCENT, whom we remember as the Sicilian Fabrizzio. He moves toward his parked car. Gets in.

MED. LONG VIEW

The starter turns, and the automobile blows in a great explosion.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. THE TAHOE ESTATE - NIGHT

The waltz continues over the VIEW of the empty, but still illuminated pavilion. There is the debris of the great party spread over the grounds, which a silent crew of workmen are at work cleaning up,

MED. VIEW

Michael walks alone, followed by two of the family dogs, Irish Setters.

He walks to the water line, and looks out across the lake. He picks up a stick, and throws it for the dogs; who go scampering after it.

We notice that a respectful distance away, there are bodyguards watching every move he makes.

CLOSE VIEW ON MICHAEL

looking across the lake. There is much on his mind. The SOUND of the waltz, begins to segue into the echoed music and laughter of an old Italian Music Hall from the past.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. NEW YORK THEATRE - 1915 - NIGHT

VITO CORLEONE is a shy young man of 23, holding his hat in his hand, being led down the crowded aisle of this Italian Vaudeville theatre by an energetic and fulfilled GENCO ABBANDANDO, his friend in America. This entire sequence is played in Sicilian.

GENCO Come on, you've got to see her!

VIEW ON THE STAGE

A tattered melodrama is in progress in Neapolitan. The sets are two-dimensional, and flap whenever there's an entrance or exit.

The hero, PEPPINO, is weeping as he sings about how he's left his Mother in Italy, while he is in this new country, America.

VIEW ON THE AUDIENCE

All poor, Italo-Americans. Genco finds a few seats, and leads Vito to them, stepping on a few shoes in the process. They have barely come to their seats, when an excited Genco nudges Vito, and points to the stage. People shout that they should sit down.

VIEW ON THE STAGE

There is a knock on the door, and a young girl enters, delivering a letter to Peppino in his tenement in America. The girl is pretty; and obviously the object of Genco's affection. The letter brings bad news. Peppino's Mother is dead. He weeps, and sings the final song, which most of the audience knows: SENZA MAMMA.

VIEW ON THE AUDIENCE

Genco is enthralled with the young actress. The people in the audience are singing along with Peppino.

VIEW ON THE STAGE

The actress, object of Genco's affection, makes a dramatic exit.

VIEW ON THE AUDIENCE

Genco pulls on Vito's jacket, indicating that now that his love is offstage, they should leave. Vito rises with him, and they make their way all the way down the aisle.

INT. BACKSTAGE THEATRE - MOVING VIEW - NIGHT

Genco hurrying down the backstage corridor, hoping to catch a glimpse of the actress. He is followed by Vito. Suddenly, Genco stops short.

GENCO'S VIEW

A heavy-set, fierce looking Italian wearing an expensive light-colored suit and a cream colored fedora. This is FANUCCI. He is discussing a business matter with the theatre IMPRESARIO; a large, strong looking man, who is sweating nonetheless. He doesn't seem to be giving in to Fanucci. He holds a locked strongbox.

VIEW ON VITO

watching. The two men argue in Italian.

MED. VIEW

The young ACTRESS crosses into the area, unaware of the difficulties. The impresario sees her, and frightened, motions that she should keep away.

IMPRESARIO Carla!

But Fanucci grabs her easily by her slender wrist, and with lightning speed, produces a knife which he holds against her cheek. The impresario wrings his hands in agony.

IMPRESARIO (Sicilian) No...please, not my daughter.

Whereupon he begins to unlock the box which holds the receipts for the night's box-office.

VIEW ON GENCO AND VITO

hiding, watching. At first, Genco is enraged, as though he would rush up to help his enamorata.

GENCO (Sicilian) The Black Hand.

Then he backs away. Vito looks at him shocked and disappointed in this cowardly behavior. Genco shakes his head, and points, as though to say that where Fanucci is concerned, there is nothing to be done.

GENCO (Sicilian) (whispered) Let's get out of here.

VIEW ON FANUCCI

has released the girl. Her father pulls her away from him, and slaps her for no reason; then he pays Fanucci.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) Because you protested, it will cost a hundred more.

EXT. NEW YORK ALLEY - NIGHT

Genco and Vito; Genco leans against the wall, breathlessly, as though he's had a near escape.

GENCO (Sicilian) I know what you are thinking, Vitone, but you don't understand yet how things are. Fanucci is of the Black Hand. Everyone in the neighborhood pays him, even my father.

VITO (Sicilian) He's an Italian?

GENCO (Sicilian) A pig of a Neaponitan. (spits)

VITO (Sicilian) Why? Why does he bother other Italians?

GENCO (Sicilian) Because he knows them; he knows they have no one to protect them. Vitone? What do you think of my angel?

VITO (Sicilian) Beautiful.

GENCO (Sicilian) Beautiful.

VITO For you, she is beautiful. For me, there is only my wife!

GENCO I know. That's why I brought you with me!

Genco embraces his good friend, and they laughingly walk down the alley.

The stage door opens, and Fanucci exits, a sinister figure in white, moving down the alley just in front of them, into the night.

The two friends hold their breath, until he disappears.

EXT. NEW YORK STREETS - MOVING VIEW - DAY

Vito moves through the street, carrying groceries that he is to deliver.

It is cold, and so vendors are huddled around fires they have lit in old cans and drums.

He turns up an alleyway, and then stops.

VIEW UP THE ALLEY

With great strength, Fanucci lifts one of them up into the air and throws him down hard to the concrete; but another, holding onto his back, manages to produce a switchblade knife and awkwardly reaching around from behind the moving man, slits Fanucci's throat from one side to the other.

Fanucci groans like some great hurt animal. Blood pours from the deep, smile-like slit in his throat.

He throws the young man off his back.

VIEW ON VITO

stepping back in the alley.

VIEW ON FANUCCI

He takes off his white fedora, and runs down the alley toward Vito, catching the flowing blood in his hat.

The young attackers scurry off in various directions.

INT. ABBANDANDO GROCERY STORE - DAY

A tiny shop featuring imported food: trays of cured meats, prosciutto, copagole, mortadella lies on the counter covered with netting to keep away the thousands of flies.

Olive oil is sold in bulk, as well as wine, cheese and bacala.

Genco works here for his father, and is busy slicing paper thin prosciutto for a customer, by hand. Vito works in the back as a stock clerk.

Finished with his customer, Genco moves to his friend.

GENCO (Sicilian) I bet you can't guess what happened?

VITO (Sicilian) What?

GENCO (Sicilian) Some guys from Ninth Avenue jumped Fanucci today; slit his throat from ear to ear.

VITO (Sicilian) No, I didn't know. Is he dead?

GENCO (Sicilian) Nah. Those guys aren't murderers. They wanted to scare him, that's all. Make him look bad.

VITO (Sicilian) In Sicily, when you attack a man, you had better finish him.

GENCO (Sicilian) I wish they had. He takes fifty dollars a week from my father's cash drawer. But you can't kill a man like Fanucci.

VITO (Sicilian) Why?

GENCO (Sicilian) Because he's what we say... "connected"... You wait, see what happens to those guys from Ninth Avenue.

A customer enters; and Genco moves away to serve him.

CLOSE VIEW ON VITO

recalling what he had seen and thought.

EXT. NEW YORK ALLEYWAY - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

A young man, one of those who had tried to kill Fanucci, runs down an alleyway, breathlessly. Then he stops, and looks behind himself. Whoever was following him is gone. He turns and walks ahead. Then the mammoth, white-suited figure of Fanucci leaps down before him from the fire-escape. He grins at the young man, and then raises his neck, showing the gruesome wound that marks his throat.

He takes out his pistol and fires point-blank at his attacker.

INT. TINY TENEMENT - FULL VIEW - NIGHT

The very small, railroad type flat where Vito lives with his new family.

It is late at night, and he is exhausted.

He returns home; where his young wife, CARMELLA, goes through the silent ritual of preparing a simple meal for him. He sits and eats quietly.

INT. TENEMENT ROOM - NIGHT

Vito and Carmella enter the darkened bedroom, and approach a metal crib. Vito reaches down and takes the small hand of the baby between his thick peasant fingers. Carmella waits a respectful distance behind him.

INT. ABBANDANDO GROCERY - DAY

The shop bell RINGS; SINGER ABBANDANDO turns to see a smiling Fanucci tipping his hat, like an old customer.

FANUCCI Buon giorno.

Immediately, Vito turns back to his work, and Signor Abbandando moves to Fanucci with a sigh.

Vito notices the two men talking quietly at one side of the store, while he goes about his work. Genco works his way closer to his friend.

GENCO (Sicilian) What did I tell you. The one who cut him was found in an alley. And the family of the others paid Fanucci all their savings to make him forswear his vengeance.

VITO (Sicilian) (surprised) And he agreed?

GENCO (Sicilian) He took the money. Now he wants double from everybody in the neighborhood, including Papa.

Vito watches the heated, but inevitable transaction.

VITO (Sicilian) (almost to himself) A real mafioso doesn't sell his vengeance.

MED. VIEW

Signor Abbandando seems to be arguing with Fanucci, and every so often they turn and relate to where Vito is working. Then Fanucci leaves, the little bell RINGING; and Signor Abbandando reluctantly moves to Vito.

SIG. ABBANDANDO (Sicilian) Vitone. How is your son?

VITO (Sicilian) We are all well.

It is clear that he has something difficult to tell the young man.

SIG. ABBANDANDO Vitone...I...Fanucci has a nephew.

Vito looks at him a while, as the old man struggles to tell him.

VITO (Sicilian) And you must give him my job.

The old man nods, regretfully.

VITO (Sicilian) You have been kind to me since I was a boy; taken care of me, and been as a father. I will always be grateful to you. Thank you.

Vito takes off his apron, and leaves, passing the youth who loiters by the counter.

EXT. THE STREET - DAY

making his way from the store.

SIG. ABBANDANDO (Sicilian o.s.) Vitone!

He turns, and Abbandando has followed him out of the shop, holding a basket of some groceries.

SIG. ABBANDANDO Here...for your family.

VITO No...please understand...I cannot accept.

INT. VITO'S TENEMENT - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

Vito and his wife sit quietly at the table; the two are quiet and sad.

Suddenly, we HEAR a noise, and Vito is astonished to see a young man, PETER CLEMENZA, leaning out of the window on the other side of the air shaft which separates their apartments.

CLEMENZA Hey Paisan! Hold this for me until I ask for it. Hurry up!

Automatically Vito reaches over to the empty space at the air shaft, and takes the bundle of rags. Clemenza's round face is strained and urgent, obviously in some kind of trouble. Suddenly, he closes the window and there is activity that we cannot see in the other apartment.

Vito looks to his wife, and then closes the window and window dressing and takes the bundle into a private part of his kitchen and begins to unwrap it.

WHAT HE SEES:

Five oily guns. He immediately wraps them again, and carries them to a private closet, and hides it, and returns to his wife. He sits down back at the table; and she knows not to ask him what has happened.

EXT. NEW YORK STREETS - DAY

Vito is walking through the crowded streets with a group of workmen; they all wear work clothes, and paper hats on their heads.

Vito looks to his left, and realizes that Clemenza is walking silently with him; by contrast, Clemenza dresses well.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) (casually) Do you have my goods still?

Vito nods.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Did you look inside?

Vito, his face impassive, shakes his head 'no.'

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) I'm not interested in things that don't concern me.

INT. DOWNTOWN ITALIAN SOCIAL CLUB - DAY

Vito and Clemenza drinking wine; they've become friends.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) I have a friend who has a fine rug. Maybe your wife would like it.

VITO (Sicilian) We have no money for a rug.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) No. He would give it away. I know how to repay a consideration.

Vito thinks, then nods.

VITO (Sicilian) She would like it.

INT. HALLWAY WEALTHY APARTMENT BUILDING - DAY

The two men proceed up the hallway; Vito is impressed with the opulence.

VITO (Sicilian) Your friend lives in a fine building.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Oh yes, the very best.

Clemenza knocks on the door as though he is well known here; then rings. No answer.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Ah, he's not at home. Oh, well, he wouldn't mind.

Quickly and expertly he takes out a tool and pries open the door.

INT. WEALTHY APARTMENT - FULL VIEW - DAY

Vito looks in awe at the luxurious apartment, which features a fabulous rich red wool rug.

Clemenza immediately moves some of the furniture away, and drops to the floor.

CLEMENZA A little help.

Vito joins him, and the two begin rolling the rug. We HEAR a BUZZER RING. Clemenza immediately drops his side of the roll, and moves to the window. He pulls a gun from his jacket.

VIEW ON Vito watching. He moves so he can see out the window.

THEIR VIEW

A Policeman stands at the exterior door, waiting. He rings the buzzer again.

VIEW ON CLEMENZA

cocking his gun. Vito realizes that if the Policeman should pursue it any further he is a dead man. The Policeman gives up and leaves.

Clemenza puts away his gun.

INT. VITO'S TENEMENT HALLWAY - DAY

The two men run up the steps, laughing, carrying the fine rug.

INT. VITO'S TENEMENT - DAY

They are on their knees cutting the rug to fit the small room. Carmella watches, holding the baby SANTINO.

MED. CLOSE ON CLEMENZA

Like a professional, cutting quickly, with the proper tools. He sings as he works.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. DOWNTOWN WAREHOUSE - NIGHT

Clemenza knocks on the steel door of this downtown building. Vito waits with him, holding some packages; and another youth, TESSIO, tall and thin and deadly waits with them.

The door is lifted, and they are greeted by a bright, middle-aged Italian named AUGUSTINO who leads them into a machine shop.

INT. MACHINE SHOP - NIGHT

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Good, you waited for us.

Clemenza looks up on a higher level.

HIS VIEW

There is a nine year old boy, operating a drill press.

MED. VIEW

TESSIO (Sicilian) Who is he?

AUGUSTINO (Sicilian) My son, Carmine...it's all right.

The men then quickly open the packages they've brought; revealing gun, including a more sophisticated machine weapon.

Augustino takes them and expertly begins to clean and prepare them.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) (to Vito) Paisan Augustino was a gunsmith in the Italian army. We do each other favors.

AUGUSTINO (Sicilian) (while he works) My boy is studying the flute. He plays very well. He helps me at night so we can buy him a silver flute someday. Now he has one made of wood. Carmine...play...play for my friends.

VIEW ON THE BOY

wide-eyed... he shuts off the press; and takes out a shabby wooden flute. And begins to play a simple and pure melody.

CLOSE ON VITO

listening.

CLOSE ON AUGUSTINO

proudly smiling, as he prepares the machine gun.

CLOSE ON TESSIO

listening, smiling.

FULL VIEW

The men listening, as the boy's father prepares their guns.

EXT. WAREHOUSE AREA - NIGHT

Tessio and Clemenza quickly load racks of cheap dresses.

Vito sits behind the wheel of the truck. He seems reserved, and we get the impression that he is studying every move his two friends are making.

INT. TENEMENT STAIRS - DAY

Clemenza runs up a flight of stairs with an armful of dresses. He knocks on a door, and a pretty HOUSEWIFE answers.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Lady, I got a bargain on these dresses. Five dollars each. You gotta pay at least fifteen, maybe twenty in a store. Look at them, first class.

He holds the dresses up and the woman seems interested. She handles a couple of them and stands aside so Clemenza can enter her apartment.

WOMAN (Sicilian) I don't know which one I like best.

She holds the dresses against her body, Clemenza approving of each one; and then she goes to her purse and takes out five singles and gives them to him.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) You'd look beautiful in all of these. You should buy at least two.

WOMAN (Sicilian) Are you kidding? My husband will kill me if he knows I paid five dollars for one dress.

She holds one up, then another. She is torn. Clemenza shakes his head and straightens the dress on her body. His hand brushes her arm; she looks at him smiling.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) You can have two for five.

She smiles back.

EXT. TENEMENT BUILDING - DAY

Clemenza jumps down the stairs, and out to the middle of the street, where Vito and Tessio are waiting in the car with some of the stock.

TESSIO (Sicilian) What took so long?

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) She couldn't decide.

Tessio and Clemenza each take more armsful of dresses and divide the neighborhood.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Vito, take the rest of the stock over to Dandine's warehouse; he'll move it to a wholesaler.

The three part. Vito drives the truck off.

MOVING VIEW

Vito drives the truck through the downtown streets; he turns a corner and stops for a light.

Suddenly, to his left, he sees the formidable figure of Fanucci.

He grabs young Corleone by the shoulder.

CLOSE VIEW ON FANUCCI

frightening, revealing the large circular scar, now healed.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) Ahhh, young fellow. People tell me you're rich, you and your two friends. Yet, you don't show enough respect to send a few dresses to my home. You know I have three daughters.

Vito says nothing. Fanucci thumbs through the stock.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) This is my neighborhood. You and your friends have to show me a little respect, ah? This truck you hijacked was in my neighborhood. You should let me wet my beak a little.

Fanucci takes a few of the dresses.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) I understand each of you cleared around six hundred dollars. I expect two hundred dollars for my protection and I'll forget the insult. After all, young people don't know the courtesies due a man like myself.

Vito smiles at him and nods.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) Otherwise the police will come to see you and your wife and children will be dishonored and destitute. Of course, if my information as to your gains is incorrect, I'll dip my beak just a little. Just a little, but no less than one hundred dollars, and don't try to deceive me, eh paisan?

VITO (Sicilian) (quietly) My two friends have my share of the money. I'll have to speak to them after we deliver these to the wholesaler.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) You tell your friends I expect them to let me wet my beak in the same manner. Don't be afraid to tell them. Clemenza and I know each other well, he understands these things. Let yourself be guided by him. He has more experience in these matters.

VITO (Sicilian) (shrugging innocently) You must understand, this is all new to me...

FANUCCI (Sicilian) I understand...

VITO (Sicilian) But thank you for speaking to me as a Godfather.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) (impressed) You're a good fellow.

He takes Vito's hands and clasps them in his own.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) You have respect. A fine thing in the young. Next time, speak to me first, eh? Perhaps I can help you make your plans.

Fanucci turns with the dresses draped over his arms, waving to Vito.

Vito throws the truck in gear, and drives off.

CLOSE VIEW ON VITO

We know that throughout this encounter he has seethed with an icy rage.

INT. VITO'S APARTMENT - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

He wife serves a dinner for her husband and his two friends. They discuss Fanucci as they eat.

TESSIO (Sicilian) Do you think he'd be satisfied with the two hundred dollars? I think he would.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) That scar-faced bastard will find out what we got from the wholesaler. He won't take a dime less than three hundred dollars.

TESSIO (Sicilian) What if we don't pay?

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) (gestures, it's hopeless) You know his friends...real animals. And his connections with the police. Sure he'd like us to tell him our plans so he can set us up for the cops and earn their gratitude. Then they would owe him a favor; that's how he operates. We'll have to pay. Three hundred, are we agreed?

TESSIO (Sicilian) What can we do?

Clemenza doesn't even bother checking for Vito's opinion.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) They say Fanucci has a license from Maranzalla himself to work this neighborhood.

VITO (Sicilian) If you like, why not give me fifty dollars each to pay Fanucci. I guarantee he will accept that amount from me.

TESSIO (Sicilian) When Fanucci says two hundred he means two hundred. You can't talk with him.

VITO (Sicilian) I'll reason with him. Leave everything in my hands. I'll settle this problem to your satisfaction.

Tessio and Clemenza regard him suspiciously.

VITO (Sicilian) I never lie to people I've accepted as my friends. Speak to Fanucci yourself tomorrow. Let him ask you for the money, but don't pay it, and don't in any way quarrel with him. Tell him you have to get the money and will send me as your messenger. Let him understand that you're willing to pay what he asks, don't bargain. I'll go to his house, and quarrel with him. He likes me; enjoys explaining how things are here. He uses ten sentences when he only needs one, so while he talks, I'll kill him.

Clemenza, irritated, makes a large belch, and washes his food down with wine.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) Vitone! (to Tessio) Our driver has drunk too much wine.

TESSIO (Sicilian) (laughs at himself) He's going to kill Fanucci.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) (stern) Then, after that, what? Joe 'Little Knife' Pisani; Willie Bufalino, maybe, Mr. Maranzalla himself, c'mon!

VITO (Sicilian) Fanucci is not connected; he is alone.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) (sarcastically) What? You read it in the papers?

VITO (Sicilian) This man informs to the police; this man allows his vengeance to be bought off... No, he is alone.

TESSIO (Sicilian) If you're wrong...

VITO (Sicilian) If I'm wrong, they will kill me.

Both Clemenza and Tessio are impressed with their young friend; his willingness to risk his life on his perception of the situation.

EXT. NEW YORK STREET - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

A ten piece Italian street band plays in front of the church to commemorate the first night of the Festa di San Gennaro. People swarm in crowds, delighted by the music, as out of the church four men carry the statue of San Gennaro down to the street.

MOVING VIEW

Clemenza moves along the booths that have been set up along the street: sausage cooking on an open fire; pork livers and sweetbeards. He stops for a sandwich, and makes an irritated gesture when the vendor expects to be paid. He crosses to a church-sponsored booth with a great Wheel of Fortune, and slaps a dollar on a number. Standing next to him is Vito; they embrace.

CLEMENZA (Sicilian) (quietly) All three daughters are at church; he is alone. It's important that you let his neighbors see you leave. Tessio has broken the latch on the skylight of his building.

The wheel stops; they both lose.

CLEMENZA (English) See, Brother Carmello, even the church makes numbers.

PRIEST (English) It's only the way we collect that's different.

Vito has left while Clemenza jokes with the Priest.

EXT. FESTA STREET - NIGHT

Vito passes the booths of food, crossing toward a small and dark club.

INT. SOCIAL CLUB - NIGHT

We can still HEAR the crowds and music of the festa. Vito enters; the club is empty, except for the large white figure sitting alone at a small table. Fanucci barely acknowledges Vito as he joins him.

Without a word, Vito counts out two hundred dollars on the table. Fanucci looks, then takes off his fedora and puts it on the table over the money.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) I think there's only two hundred dollars under my hat. (he peeks) I'm right. Only two hundred dollars.

VITO (Sicilian) I'm a little short. I've been out of work. Let me owe you the money for a few weeks.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) Ah, you're a sharp young fellow. How is it I've never noticed you before (he takes the two hundred and pours some wine for Vito) You're too quiet for your own interest. I could find some work for you to do that would be very profitable. (he rises) No hard feelings, eh? If I can ever do you a service let me know. You've done a good job for yourself tonight.

EXT. FESTA STREET - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

By now the musicians have left, but still families are walking the street, and stopping at the booths.

Fanucci stands there a moment; he is known by everyone, and considers himself highly loved.

Then Fanucci begins the walk through the festa, on his way home.

EXT. ROOFTOPS - MOVING VIEW - NIGHT

Vito silently moves along the rooftop; paralleling Fanucci's walk.

We HEAR the sounds of the festa, and every so often catch a glimpse of the patterned lights, and the crowds below.

EXT. FESTA STREETS - MOVING VIEW ON FANUCCI - NIGHT

walking through the crowded streets. The statue of San Gennaro is arranged in some midnight religious ceremony.

The VIEW LIFTS UP, to the rooftops.

EXT. THE ROOFTOPS - NIGHT

Vito makes the leap that separates two buildings; then crosses toward the large skylight in the center of the building.

EXT. THE STREETS - NIGHT

The procession in the streets is preceded by ten altar boys; and the glittering Monstrance, something of an altar carried out into the streets.

The priest begins this nocturnal service, as the crowds in the street kneel down in prayer.

INT. FANUCCI'S BUILDING - NIGHT

Fanucci unlocks the door to his building; we can HEAR the services in the background.

EXT. THE ROOFTOP - NIGHT

Vito tries the trap door on the roof; it is stuck firmly shut; despite Clemenza's instructions. He struggles with it, but no luck.

From the distance, the Choir begins to Latin. Vito moves around the skylight, to an identical trap, tries this one; it opens.

EXT. THE MONSTRANCE - MED. VIEW ON THE PRIEST - NIGHT

performing the services in Latin. The ten altar boys are in attendance.

EXT. THE ROOFTOP - NIGHT

Vito reaches down into the trap, and pulls out the newly oiled gun that has been left for him. He slides down into the building.

INT. FANUCCI'S HALLWAY - DOWN ANGLE - NIGHT

Fanucci proceeds up the staircase with loud, heavy steps. An OLD WOMAN on one of the flights sees him, and immediately moves to her apartment.

FANUCCI (Sicilian) What's the matter, Signora? You don't say 'good evening'?

WOMAN (Sicilian) 'Good evening,' Signor Fanucci.

She quickly disappears behind her door. Fanucci laughs, continues up, singing to himself. The MASS outside is always in evidence.

INT. HALLWAY - NIGHT

Vito climbs down from the attic, and finds Fanucci's rear door open. He slips in, and makes his way past the open windows, out of which pour the music and chanting of the Mass. Slowly and quietly he pulls them down, shut.

He moves quietly to a glass door, and peeks out.

WHAT HE SEES:

Three young women, Fanucci's DAUGHTERS, laughing and talking.

VIEW ON VITO

A slip up. Tessio had said they were out. He steps outside to the alley where he can look into the apartment.

ANOTHER VIEW

Fanucci opens the door of his apartment, and enters.

CLOSE VIEW ON VITO

He begins to wrap the gun.

VIEW ON THE DAUGHTERS

Their father greets them with a kiss; and a little religious gift he has bought for each.

CLOSE ON THE GUN

wrapped in this primitive method of a silencer. The VIEW TILTS to Vito, caught in the dilemma of having to kill all or none of them. Then something catches his eye.

WHAT HE SEES:

A small gray alley cat is attracted to the young man, comes up to him and rubs itself against him. Vito rubs the animal, speaking softly in Sicilian, then, gaining its confidence, lifts it up and carefully lets it into Fanucci's apartment.

He steps back, holding the gun. We HEAR some Italian shouted in the house; a loud sound from the cat, and some of the thumping footsteps of Fanucci.

VIEW ON VITO

holding the wrapped gun, waiting.

WHAT HE SEES:

The white blob of Fanucci opening the door and cursing in Italian as he throws the cat out.

VIEW ON VITO

squeezing the trigger; the muffled, but still LOUD BLAST resounding in the building.

VIEW ON FANUCCI

He holds onto the door frame, trying to stand erect, trying to reach for his gun. The force of his struggle has torn the buttons off his jacket and made it swing loose. His gun is exposed but so is a spidery vein on the white shirtfront of his stomach. Carefully, as if plunging a needle into this vein, Vito Corleone fires a second bullet.

Fanucci falls to his knees, propping the door open, giving a terrible groan. We begin to hear the VOICES of girls inside the apartment.

Vito quickly opens his wallet, removes the two hundred, quickly fires one last bullet into Fanucci's sweaty cheek. Now the towel the gun was wrapped with catches fire, literally on Vito's hand; quickly he throws it to the ground, stamps it out...and disappears upward.

EXT. THE ROOFTOPS - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

Vito moves like a cat along the rooftops; we HEAR the conclusion of the Mass down below.

CLOSE ON VITO

Pausing; we can SEE the great spectacle of lights and candles on the streets below.

He empties the gun of bullets and smashes the barrel against the side of the roof ledge. He reverses it in his hand, and breaks the butt into two separate halves against the chimney. He smashes it again, and the pistol breaks into barrel and handle, two separate pieces.

He then moves along the rooftop, dropping the two separate fragments into various air shafts.

EXT. THE STREET PROCESSION - MOVING VIEW - NIGHT

The Priest, having completed the ceremony, follows as the Monstrance is carried off through the streets, as the Choir sings.

EXT. THE ROOFTOPS - MOVING VIEW - NIGHT

Vito is a dark figure, moving with agility across the rooftops.

INT. FANUCCI'S VESTIBULE - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

The corpse that was Fanucci, stained with blood.

EXT. PROCESSION - CLOSE VIEW - NIGHT

The statue of San Gennaro, followed by the altar boys.

EXT. CORLEONE TENEMENT - MED. VIEW - NIGHT

Vito's wife; her baby and several friends and neighbors sit happily on the front stoop of their tenement. Some of the men drink wine poured out of a pitcher; we can still HEAR the music and night sounds of the Festa.

A neighbor is singing a Neapolitan song.

Quietly, without a word, and with only a momentary glance from his wife, Vito joins the little group; takes a glass of wine, and listens to the song.

CLOSE VIEW ON VITO

listening to the song. He reaches out and takes the small hand of his son.

VITO (Sicilian) Santino, your papa loves you.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. ANTHONY'S TAHOE ROOM - NIGHT

The room is large, lit from the outside by a bright evening. We can see the outline of many toys on the shelves built along the wall. We see the dark figure of Michael Corleone enter the room and approach the bed where his son Anthony lies curled in messy blankets. Michael quietly arranges his small hands and feet and covers the little boy. Suddenly, Anthony turns, his eyes open. He is staring, perfectly awake, at his father.

MICHAEL Can't you sleep?

No answer.

MICHAEL Are you alright?

ANTHONY Yes.

MICHAEL Did you like your party?

ANTHONY I got lots of presents.

MICHAEL Do you like them?

ANTHONY I didn't know the people who gave them to me.

MICHAEL They were friends.

He kisses his boy, and then turns.

ANTHONY Did you see my present for you?

MICHAEL No, where is it?

ANTHONY On your pillow.

MICHAEL I'm leaving very early tomorrow, before you wake up.

ANTHONY I know. How long will you be gone?

MICHAEL Just a few days.

ANTHONY Will you take me?

MICHAEL I can't.

ANTHONY Why do you have to go?

MICHAEL To do business.

ANTHONY I can help you.

MICHAEL Some day you will.

Michael kisses him again.

INT. MICHAEL-KAY'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

The room is lit from a small night lamp on Michael's side of the large bed.

Kay is huddled in blankets, asleep. Michael closes the door to his room, moves to his side of the bed, and glances down to the pillow.

VIEW ON THE PILLOW

is a child's drawing of a long limousine, with a man in a hat sitting in the back seat.

An arrow pointing to him is marked "DAD." Under it, a nine year old's handwriting says: "Do you like it? Check YES __ I liked it or NO __ I didn't like it." Michael turns, looking for a pencil, and moves to the dresser, where he places a check next to "YES."

He starts to cross back toward his side of the bed, when Kay turns, almost in her sleep:

KAY Michael? Why are the drapes open?

His eyes dart back to the curved, beautifully leaded windows of the room. The DRAPES are opened. Then, without a second's hesitation, he leaps to the floor, still holding his son's drawing, as a spray of machine gun bullets sweep across the windows; glass shattering all over the room.

Kay screams out; rising, still half-asleep. Michael crawls toward her, and pulls her down to the floor to him.

Then, for a moment, there is silence, soon filled by the shouts of men; as flashes of light sweep by the window, as guards with flashlights come running.

Michael holds Kay to him, knowing they have both survived, and then gently:

MICHAEL Go with the kids.

EXT. THE TAHOE ESTATE - NIGHT

Suddenly, the great floodlights are turned on, bathing lawns in an intense blue light.

Groups of ordinarily dressed security men drawn in from all directions; a state of confusion prevails. There is no sign of the attackers.

VIEW BY MICHAEL'S HOUSE

Michael is joined by Rocco Lampone, his gun drawn.

ROCCO They're still on the property. Maybe you better stay inside.

MICHAEL Keep them alive.

Six men take up posts by Michael's house.

ROCCO We'll try.

MICHAEL It's important.

He returns inside.

EXT. MAIN GATE AND KENNELS - NIGHT

The character of the summer estate has changed: bright floodlights illuminate the main points of entry: the main gate; the waterway; the stone wall that encompasses the estate on all sides.

Several men with flashlights reinforce the guard at the main gate.

FULL VIEW

Off in the distance, we see another group of men with flashlights combing the waterline. We hear indistinguishable shouts.

VIEW ON THE KENNELS

The wire gates are opened, and the trained dogs go out yelping into the outer edge of the estate.

ROOFTOP

One of Rocco's men turns the large floodlight scanning darkened forest areas, where men could hide.

MOVING VIEW

Men with flashlights and dogs. Moving through the dark areas.

LOOSE VIEW

A small Corleone launch, with a bright spotlight slowly cruises the boundaries of the estate. We SEE the silhouette of men with guns, quietly waiting and watching.

EXT. MICHAEL'S HOUSE - NIGHT

Some of the bodyguards by the shattered windows of Michael's bedroom.

The curtains are drawn from inside.

INT. MICHAEL'S HOUSE - NIGHT

Kay, the children, and some women servants have come down from the various rooms into the central living area, that can be most easily secured. The little girl is still asleep; they make you think of an immigrant family, with their blankets and frightened faces, all waiting in a central room.

Michael goes up to Kay, squeezes her hand, and whispers:

MICHAEL It will be all right. We were lucky.

She says nothing; but her face expresses the anger she feels over the jeopardy Michael has placed his children in. She holds her young daughter in her arms.

The door opens, and Rocco enters. He quickly realizes he is holding his gun in plain view in front of the family, and puts it away. Michael moves to him, and they talk a distance away from Kay.

ROCCO Your family all seem to be okay in the other houses; your Mother's still sleeping.

MICHAEL And?

ROCCO No sign of them yet; but they're still on the Estate.

We HEAR loud shouting from outside.

DEANNA (O.S.) Goddamn you! You're all nuts here, I'm not goin' to calm down...

MICHAEL'S VIEW

Through the door, that Rocco opens.

Deanna, in her nightgown, has been frightened by the gunshots; while Fredo in his bathrobe, tries to get her back into the house.

FREDO Deanna, will you get back into the house!

DEANNA I'm getting out of here I said; these guys all have guns!

MICHAEL Fredo, can't you shut that woman up! (to Rocco's men) Get her in here!

The bodyguards, gracefully help Fredo bring the hysterical Deanna into the safety of the house.

DEANNA (whimpering) I don't want to stay here...

FREDO Mike, what can I do, she's a hysterical woman...

KAY Leave her alone! You're talking as though she has no right to be frightened when there are machine guns going off in her backyard.

MICHAEL (to Rocco) Have Tom Hagen meet me in the Harbor House.

EXT. TAHOE ESTATE - HIGH ANGLE - NIGHT

Michael walks the short distance from his house, to the boathouse where he conducts his business away from his family.

A small group of bodyguards, carrying machine guns, make the walk with him from all sides, a respectful distance away. It gives the appearance of a lonely President moving in his compound, followed by teams of Secret Service men.

The boathouse is already secured by teams of men, hastily wakened from their lodge house; a barracks-like structure where reinforcements are lodged just for this kind of emergency.

FULL VIEW

In the distance, we can see the teams of men and dogs, with their lights, guns and shouts, combing every inch of the estate.

INT. THE BOATHOUSE - EMPTY VIEW - NIGHT

Michael alone in the great room. He moves to a walk-in safe, quickly runs through the combination, and opens it. He takes out an envelope, and puts it into his pocket; there's a KNOCK on the door, and Hagen enters. He had been asleep, and has quickly thrown on a robe.

MICHAEL Sit down, Tom.

EXT. TAHOE BOATHOUSE - NIGHT

From outside the leaded windows, a disoriented Hagen sits down; Michael starts to talk to him; obviously about something very serious.

The patrol securing the boathouse, walk past the window. Michael says something to Tom, who rises, and pulls the drapes, obscuring OUR VIEW.

INT. TAHOE BOATHOUSE - NIGHT

Michael talks intimately to Tom.

MICHAEL There's a lot I can't tell you, Tom. I know that's upset you in the past; and you've felt that it was because of some lack of trust or confidence. But it is because I do trust you that I've kept so much secret from you. It's precisely that at this moment, you are the only one that I can completely trust. In time, you'll understand everything.

HAGEN (nods with this statement) But your people... Neri... Rocco; you don't think...

MICHAEL No, I have confidence in their loyalty... but this is life and death, and Tom, you are my brother.

Hagen in very moved.

HAGEN Mikey, I hoped...

MICHAEL No Tom, just listen. All my people are businessmen; their loyalty is based on that. One thing I learned from my father is to try to think as the people around you think...and on that basis, anything is possible. Fredo has a good heart, but he is weak...and stupid, and stupid people are the most dangerous of all. I've kept you out of things, Tom, because I've always known that your instincts were legitimate, and I wanted you to know very little of things that would make you an accomplice, for your own protection. I never blamed you for the setbacks the family took under Sonny; I know you were in a position of limited power, and you did your best to advise and caution him. What I am saying is that now, for how long I do not know, you will be the Don. If what I think has happened is true; I will leave tonight, and absolutely no one will know how to contact me. And even you are not to try to reach me unless it is absolutely necessary. I give you complete power: over Neri... Fredo, everyone. I am trusting you with the lives of my wife and children, and the future of this family, solely resting on your judgment and talent.

VIEW ON HAGEN

A man who has steadily declined over the last five years, realizing that total power and responsibility is being placed on him.

MICHAEL (continuing) ...But Tom, you must know that I do this only because I believe you are the only one who is capable of taking over for me.

VIEW ON MICHAEL

taking out the envelope.

MICHAEL I've prepared this; have had it for over a month. It won't explain everything; but indicates where I will be, so in a sense, it is my life. (he hands the envelope to Hagen) Also, there are three tasks that must be executed immediately. Pop would have given those to Luca -- You knew Pop as well as anyone, act as though you were him. It discusses Kay as well; that will be the most difficult. The men who tried to kill me tonight, will never leave the estate.

HAGEN Will we...be able to get who ordered it out of them?

MICHAEL I don't think so. Unless I'm very wrong...they're already dead. Killed by someone inside...very frightened that they botched it. That's why I am going to disappear in a few minutes, and leave everything to you.

HAGEN But if you're wrong...

MICHAEL If I'm wrong...

There is a KNOCK on the door.

MICHAEL ...I don't think I'm wrong. (he indicates the knock) Yes.

The door opens; it is Rocco; Michael rises, after making a knowing glance toward Tom, and moves to talk quietly to a frightened and agitated Rocco.

EXT. STONE WALL AND STREAM - MOVING VIEW - NIGHT

A group of men with flashlights and guns lead Michael, Tom and Rocco to the stone bridge spanning the stream which runs through the estate.

LOW CLOSE VIEW

Michael's dispassionate face, looking down. THE VIEW MOVES to Hagen's, and then down to the murky water under the bridge, where we see the bodies of three strangers, lying in the moving water; machine-type guns nearby, with their throats cut. Light from the many flashlights illuminates the grotesque scene.

MICHAEL (O.S.) Fish them out.

Several of the men wade down into the stream; Rocco helps, and even Tom steps down to get a better look at who they were. They are total strangers; Rocco examines the type of guns they used.

When they climb back onto the ground, Michael is gone. Everyone notices it, but no one says anything.

Hagen stands there, holding the envelope Michael had given him in his hand.

He realizes that now, he is the DON.

HAGEN Get rid of the bodies. Tomorrow morning I want a report made to the local police, and paper, that some explosives we keep on the property were accidentally ignited.

The men respond; Hagen makes the lonely walk back to the lighted section of the compound, which now resembles a prison camp.

FADE OUT.

FADE IN:

INT. STATE SENATE FLOOR - DAY

The Senate is in session; Senator Geary is on the floor during a vote. An aide approaches him, with a slip of paper.

INT. GEARY'S OFFICE - DAY

The Senator steps behind his desk.

SENATOR GEARY All right, Mr. Hagen, you've got ten minutes.

He flicks the switch of a small tape recorder.

SENATOR GEARY ...and the tape will be running.

HAGEN Actually, I've come with good news; the Corleone family has done you a favor.

The Senator immediately shuts the tape recorder off.

SENATOR GEARY What the hell are you talking about?

HAGEN We know you're a busy man, with plenty of enemies -- we saw the opportunity to do you a favor, and we did. No strings.

SENATOR GEARY No strings.

HAGEN You know there's a Senate Investigating Committee recently set up; we thought it would be unfortunate if they were to trace anything though-provoking to your name.

SENATOR GEARY No one can trace anything to me; I pride myself on that.

HAGEN Do you gamble?

SENATOR GEARY A little; what's so thought- provoking about that?

HAGEN Do you owe markers?

SENATOR GEARY Maybe two, three thousand dollars.

Hagen leans forward, and deposits a handful of paper on the Senator's desk.

HAGEN The Corleone family has paid them off for you...as an expression of our esteem.

Geary quickly looks through the paid markers.

SENATOR GEARY There's thirty grand worth of paid off markers -- I never owed that much.

HAGEN Our mistake. But what does it matter; it was our money. (rising) We don't even expect thanks.

SENATOR GEARY You paid off thirty grand I never owed.

HAGEN We'll keep it quiet; the people who know are trustworthy...the Committee needn't find out.

SENATOR GEARY And what's the price of their not finding out.

HAGEN Simple. Be friendly like us. Not hostile.

SENATOR GEARY (he despises Hagen) Thanks...friend.

EXT. TAHOE ESTATE - FULL VIEW - DAY

There are more men on duty than usual; not that there are guns apparent, but it's clear that the boundaries are being patrolled.

VIEW BY MICHAEL'S HOUSE

Kay exits her house, followed by her children; she helps them into her station wagon like any housewife, and drives along the path leading to the main gate.

She's about to drive through, when one of the men steps in front of her, raising his hand.

KAY (graciously) Yes.

MAN I'm sorry, Mrs. Corleone. We're not to let you through.

KAY (disbelieving) I'm going to the market.

MAN If you could just give us a list, we'll pick up anything you want.

KAY Whose orders are these?

MAN Mr. Hagen's, ma'am.

We notice Hagen walking to them in the background.

HAGEN Kay.

VIEW THROUGH THE GATE

Hagen approaches the car; Kay gets out so they can talk away from the children.

HAGEN I wanted to explain this myself... I had business in Carson City.

He walks with her a little way from the others; the children run out of the station wagon, and start to play.

HAGEN It's Michael's request...for your safety. We can send out for anything you need.

KAY I'm supposed to stay in my house.

HAGEN Within the compound will be fine.

KAY I was supposed to take the children to New England next week.

HAGEN That's off now.

KAY I'm going to see my parents.

HAGEN Kay, Michael didn't tell me a lot; and what he did tell me, I can't repeat. But the responsibility for you and the kids was the most important thing he left me with.

KAY How long does this go on?

HAGEN I don't know. (pause) I'm sorry, Kay...

KAY Am I a prisoner?

HAGEN That's not the way we look at it.

Angrily, without another word, Kay turns away from him, and walks to her children, ignoring the running station wagon.

EXT. ITALIAN LUXURY LINER - DAY

The luxury liner making its way across the Atlantic.

INT. ITALIAN LUXURY LINER - MED. VIEW - DAY

The PURSER followed by several white uniformed associates knocks on the door of something designated the "Leonardo Suite." He is holding a telegram.

The door opens, and a tanned Merle peeks out of the door.

PURSER (holding up the telegram) I'm terribly sorry to disturb you but we have received two telegrams.

MERLE (reluctantly) Well...come in.

This entourage enters the suite, an impressive and beautifully spacious luxury suite. Connie is relaxing.

CONNIE What is it?

PURSER Yes. One is from our office in New York. The check that you wrote for your passage has been returned.

CONNIE Can't be...

MERLE Why don't you wire your bank?

PURSER The other telegram is from your bank. Your account has been closed and the company is warned not to extend any credit.

CONNIE I'll take care of it in Naples.

PURSER The company hopes so. But for now, we have orders to change your accommodations.

And with that, the men in white begin to pack Connie and Merle's luggage.

CONNIE That son of a bitch!

INT. ITALIAN LUXURY LINER - TINY THIRD CLASS CABIN - NIGHT

Connie and Merle are attempting to sleep in the miniature cabin in bunk beds. The little space is crowded with their trunks and luggage. Merle can barely hang onto the bunk, the boat pitches so violently below.

EXT. TRAIN TRACKS - MED. VIEW - DAY

A train speeds across the countryside.

>>>

II/ Godfather II.
Copyright 2005-2017. ! ! homeenglish@mail.ru